Zaretis isidora (Cramer, 1779)

Common Name:
Isidora Leafwing
Synonyms:
  • Papilio isidora (Cramer, 1779)
  • Papilio strigosus (Gmelin, , [1790])
  • Siderone zethus (Westood, 1850)
  • Siderone var. cacica (Staudinger, 1887)
  • Siderone var. strigosa (Staudinger, 1887), preocc. (not Gmelin, [1790])
  • Zaretes [sic] isidora vulpina Fruhstorfer, 1909
  • Zaretes [sic] isidora vulpecula Fruhstorfer, 1909
  • Zaretes [sic] isidora leopoldina Fruhstorfer, 1909
  • Zaretes [sic] f. bisaltina Fruhstorfer, 1909
  • Zaretes [sic] f. foliaceae Fruhstorfer, 1909
  • Zaretes [sic] isidora russeus Fruhstorfer, 1909
  • itys itys f. monops Bryk, 1953
Natural History:

The genus Zaretis has 6 species recorded in the Neotropics (Lamas, 2004). This is an exclusively neotropical genus, confined to forest habitat. Inhabit the canopy stratum (Willmott & Hall, 2001), occasionally observed in the understory. Taxonomic notes on genus Zaretis can be found in Willmott & Hall (2001).

Zaretis isidora show sexual dimorphism and both sexes are camouflaged to look like leaf. Males and females are caught in traps baited with fruit or decaying organic matter.

Distribution:
Brazil; Colombia; Paraguay; Suriname
Feeding Adult:

Adults feed on rotten fruit and rotten carrion

Feeding Caterpillars:

Host-plants compiled by Beccaloni et al. 2008:

Flacourtiaceae: Casearia sylvestris, Casearia sp.

Rhamnaceae: Colubrina glandulosa, Colubrina sp.

Color:
brown, cream, orange, yellow
Habitat:
forest
zaretis isidora male JB

Male, Jardim Botânico Adolpho Ducke, Manaus, Amazonas

Photo: Juscelino Marques Filho

zaretis isidora male dorsal

Male, from dorsal

Specimen deposited in the Collection of Invertebrates INPA, Amazonas

zaretis isidora male ventral

Male, from ventral

Specimen deposited in the Collection of Invertebrates INPA, Amazonas

zaretis isidora female dorsal

Female, from dorsal

Specimen deposited in the Collection of Invertebrates INPA, Amazonas

zaretis isidora female ventral

Female, from ventral

Specimen deposited in the Collection of Invertebrates INPA, Amazonas